Joe D'Orsie

  • Faith

  • Freedom

  • Principle

The 47th legislative district deserves a representative who isn't a career politician or in it for prestige or power. Service, NOT ambition, is Joe's primary passion. With Joe D'Orsie voters will get what they see; an honest, principled, humble leader who isn't controlled by special interest, swayed by lobbyists, or afraid of the challenges that face Pennsylvanians. It's time that confidence is restored to the office of the "public servant," and Joe is excited to earn the trust of the great people of the 47th!

ABOUT THE 47TH

Townships: Manchester, East Manchester, Hallam, Conewago, Springettsbury (zones 2,3,7)

Boroughs: Hellam, Wrightsville, Mount Wolf, Manchester / NOTICE: as of the 3/16 redistricting finalization, North York and York Haven boroughs are NO LONGER part of the 47th distict. 

* Because Joe believes that taxpayers should not be responsible for his retirement, he will defer a state pension if elected.

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District map of the 47th legislative district - PA state house

 About Joe

  • Born and raised in York County, Joe grew up in Dallastown, and after short stints in Pittsburgh, the Dominican Republic, & seven years in Lancaster, he is now back in York (Mt. Wolf).

  • While studying at Duquesne University, Joe won conference championships in two Division 1 Sports. A three-year starter for the Dukes football team at H back, he won four conference championships while competing in the MAAC and NEC conferences. As the starting heavyweight on the wrestling team for three years, he won a conference championship with the Dukes in 2006.

  • While a student at Duquesne, Joe co-hosted a weekly sports talk Radio Show, simply termed “The Show,” and did color commentary for local Pittsburgh area high school football games.

  • Joe resides in Mount Wolf, with his wife of eight years and their two children, Jude (7) and Evie (4).

  • Joe’s dad, Frank, served the country in the United States Marine Corps as an officer. He rose to the rank of Major in his tenure with the 2nd Marine Air Wing (active) and the reserves.

  • Joe loves American history, specifically history of our nation’s founding and of the Civil War era. When not reading the Bible or the News, he’s likely working on an American history book.

  • Joe currently works as the Communications Director at Praise Community Church in East York, a position he’s held for the last six years.

  • Joe served as a missionary with YWAM in 2012 in the Dominican Republic.

  • Joe has written two books - The Balanced Spiritual Diet, a 30 Day Challenge, & The Summer of Saints, Profiles of Christian Heroes that will Amaze, Encourage, & Equip (e-Book)

Problems in government typically stem from two things:

  1. Too much…government – the Government system that our founders envisioned, and classic Republicans like Lincoln and Reagan held dear, had much more to do with personal responsibility than Government overactivity. The power belongs to the people. That’s the Republican way.

  2. Short term thinking – Americans, and more specifically, Pennsylvanians, have long been negatively affected by decisions that seemed right, and may have bore fruit in the short term, but in the long run they proved ill-conceived and short sighted. Decisions in government cannot prioritize fleeting, temporal gains at the expense of our enduring interests. In other words, future generations are just as important as current ones. 

The solution is simple:

  1. Reduce the size and the scope of state government – State government has become bloated, inefficient, unaccountable, and expert at wasting taxpayers' money. Government has to be reined in, drastically shrunk, and stripped of many of its overbearing duties.

  2. Long term thinking – Rather than enjoy the fleeting benefits of short sighted decision making, let's make decisions in state government that are enduring and wise. Henry Hazlitt once said “The art of economics consists in looking not merely at the immediate but at the longer effects of any act or policy; it consists in tracing the consequences of that policy not merely for one group but for all groups.” Hazlitt was right, and this philosophy encapsulates not just economics, but government as a whole.